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Bridge Rectifier
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rrold1
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Joined: 31 Oct 2008
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 10:32 am    Post subject: Bridge Rectifier Reply with quote

I am trying to find a replacement for a bridge rectifier that I can source here in the US. Unfortunately, I don't know enough about them to select an equivalent or better replacement. The link below is a manufacturers spec sheet. I have the RS505. Can anyone help me find what I need?


http://www.dccomponents.com/products/Rectifiers/Bridge/RS501-507.pdf

Thanks All!

Steve
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Tekwiz
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Joined: 20 Oct 2008
Posts: 36
Location: Vancouver Island

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 3:27 pm    Post subject: Re: Bridge Rectifier Reply with quote

rrold1 wrote:
I am trying to find a replacement for a bridge rectifier that I can source here in the US. Unfortunately, I don't know enough about them to select an equivalent or better replacement. The link below is a manufacturers spec sheet. I have the RS505. Can anyone help me find what I need?


http://www.dccomponents.com/products/Rectifiers/Bridge/RS501-507.pdf

Thanks All!

Steve

Steve, what information do you have on the original bridge that you want to replace? There are really only 3 factors you need to be concerned about. The first is the voltage rating. This should meet or exceed that of the original component. Next is current rating. Again, this must meet or exceed that of the original. The last factor is physical size. It must fit into the available space. If you don't know the specs of your original part, post whatever info you have, including pictures. Then I can make some recommendations based on that.
Eric
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Reverend Jones
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Joined: 15 Aug 2007
Posts: 39
Location: Jonestown, Guyana

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2008 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mouser has a replacement for the RS505 - Link
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rrold1
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Joined: 31 Oct 2008
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Rev! I would have sworn that I checked mouser for a direct replacement. Anyway, they also show a replacement for the RS506 which is rated higher than the 505. Since the original RS505 failed, would there be any downside to going with the RS506 (GBU6K Fairchild)? I know that the answer is probably no due to Eric's post but I just want to be sure.

Thanks again,

Steve
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Reverend Jones
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Joined: 15 Aug 2007
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Location: Jonestown, Guyana

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The RS505 is rated 5 amps @ 600 PIV
The GBU6J is rated 6 amps @ 600 PIV
The GBU6K is rated 6 amps @ 800 PIV

Either the 6J or 6K would be a good replacement.
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Tekwiz
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Joined: 20 Oct 2008
Posts: 36
Location: Vancouver Island

PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rrold1 wrote:
Thanks Rev! I would have sworn that I checked mouser for a direct replacement. Anyway, they also show a replacement for the RS506 which is rated higher than the 505. Since the original RS505 failed, would there be any downside to going with the RS506 (GBU6K Fairchild)? I know that the answer is probably no due to Eric's post but I just want to be sure.

Thanks again,

Steve


That would depend on why the original bridge failed. If the original failed because of overheating, then a higher voltage replacement will do no good...you would have to go with a higher current rating. A higher voltage rating may help if the original failed due to a voltage spike, but even that may be of limited use, as most voltage spikes are far in excess of normal line voltages, & would pop a higher voltage rated bridge just as easily.
Eric

BTW: I missed the datasheet link in your original post. Oops. Embarassed
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rrold1
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Joined: 31 Oct 2008
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unfortunately, I am not sure what the cause was and have already ordered the replacements. At least it should be as good as the original.
Thanks for the input Eric!
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rrold1
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2008 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am at wits end trying to desolder this bugger. I have tried a solder sucker and wick but I can't seem to clear the through-holes enough to break it loose. I have even tried adding solder before applying a sucker again. I can get the pads clean with wick but the solder in the holes remains. I thought about breaking up the old bridge so that I could pull the pins one at a time but it is flush with the board and between two other components. Any tips to share?

Steve
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Alan
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Joined: 29 Jan 2006
Posts: 1399
Location: Winnipeg, MB

PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2008 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rrold1 wrote:
I am at wits end trying to desolder this bugger. I have tried a solder sucker and wick but I can't seem to clear the through-holes enough to break it loose. I have even tried adding solder before applying a sucker again. I can get the pads clean with wick but the solder in the holes remains. I thought about breaking up the old bridge so that I could pull the pins one at a time but it is flush with the board and between two other components. Any tips to share?

Steve


Yes, if the part is very hard to get out clip the component off so that all you have are the 4 component leads, then heat and pull them out separately.

You can then wick the remaining solder out so that the new component can be re-installed.

The other option is to use an iron that can heat all leads at the same time.
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Tekwiz
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Joined: 20 Oct 2008
Posts: 36
Location: Vancouver Island

PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2008 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One way that I find helpful on those tough solder joints. Heat the joint until it is fully molten, then immediatly apply a shot of compressed air, either form a blow gun, or by mouth through a pen carcass or a short piece of hose. This usually clears the holes well enough that the lead can be grabbed with pliers & rocked loose. You must be careful to find & remove any solder spray from the rest of the circuit. This is not difficult, because the spray does not stick & will brush away easily. The air puff must be applied just as the iron is being removed, so you have to be quick. Smile
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rrold1
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2008 5:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I finally managed to get it out. My solder sucker cleaned one hole perfectly. The others, not enough. I heated each pin one at a time while prying up gently and walked it out.

My new bridge arrived but looks a bit different than the original. The spacing of the legs isn't even close. What is the normal next move, some creative bending?



Thanks again for all of the help!

Steve
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Alan
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Joined: 29 Jan 2006
Posts: 1399
Location: Winnipeg, MB

PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2008 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rrold1 wrote:
I finally managed to get it out. My solder sucker cleaned one hole perfectly. The others, not enough. I heated each pin one at a time while prying up gently and walked it out.

My new bridge arrived but looks a bit different than the original. The spacing of the legs isn't even close. What is the normal next move, some creative bending?

Thanks again for all of the help!

Steve


Strange that the package style is different since board space or heatsink style often plays a part in component placement. But if the current and voltage is the same (or greater) there is no problem bending the leads and soldering the new unit in. Obviously match up the - and + symbols when inserting.

I am assuming that this component was part of the power supply for the system. I would be cautious when powering the unit up just in case something else took out the bridge.
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rrold1
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Joined: 31 Oct 2008
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could the original larger case be for the purpose of heat dissipation? The component sits about 3/4 of an inch below plastic in a sealed case. Should I add a heat sink?

The datasheet mentions:
**Device mounted on Al plate with 2.6 x 1.4" x 0.06"
Data Sheet Link

I could fabricate one and attach it with a screw. Thoughts?

Steve
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Alan
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Joined: 29 Jan 2006
Posts: 1399
Location: Winnipeg, MB

PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rrold1 wrote:
Could the original larger case be for the purpose of heat dissipation? The component sits about 3/4 of an inch below plastic in a sealed case. Should I add a heat sink?

The datasheet mentions:
**Device mounted on Al plate with 2.6 x 1.4" x 0.06"
Data Sheet Link

I could fabricate one and attach it with a screw. Thoughts?

Steve


That wouldn't hurt. What type of device is it? Does it pull a somewhat constant current? If so I would just run it for some time while monitoring the device temperature. If it only gets warm but not hot then I would leave it as is.
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rrold1
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Joined: 31 Oct 2008
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is a 12 volt battery charger but the batteries are VERY small. Imagine AA batteries wired to supply 12 volts. They charge in about an hour.

I'll try it as is and see what happens.

Thanks,

Steve
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